Saturday, September 20, 2014

Desert Dweller by Cynthia Anderson



My new book of poems, Desert Dweller, is now out--available on blurb.com (where you can preview the book by clicking the Blurb icon on this blog's sidebar), amazon.com, and locally at Rainbow Stew (as well as directly from me for $15 plus $4 shipping and handling--just send an email through my website, andersonwritingservices.com)

The cover photo is "Ryan Ranch" by Bill--there are more photos by Bill inside, and also Julianne Koza's photo of our rare local white raven.

Thanks to Steve Brown at The Sun Runner Magazine for reviewing the book in the current Desert Writers issue. He says, "If you love the desert, you will love this book."

Here's what the back cover blurbs have to say.



Cynthia Anderson’s Desert Dweller is spare and unsparing, a desiccated cholla lattice framed by an eternal sky, poetry on the edge of the ineffable. Anderson provides keen observations and a sense of solitary wonder – a trickster coyote’s unheralded death, a woman’s walk at daybreak, the last camel spotted in the wild, stones left on a miner’s grave. I love this collection of poetry and the desert it presents.
– Greg Gilbert, Trustee and Professor Emeritus, Copper Mountain College

Anderson’s language is as stark and spellbound as her subject, rising from the land itself, its alchemy of silence and time, from arias of beauty and melancholy the wind sings. Walk with her through arroyos and canyons, through quicksilver light out past the creosote and lava flows—let her show you how to know the desert with new senses. Desert Dweller is radiant, alive, waiting…
– Marsha de la O, author of Black Hope

Desert Dweller wounds your heart with an animal darkness and heals it with the Mojave sunrise. Her poems are the real deal, an authentic voice exploring and mapping territory where “if you want to be baptized / in the place of no water / humans are not the center.” The poetic intelligence on these pages moves gracefully between human mind and natural world, carrying feathers and songs, dancing with fear and joy. I urge anyone who loves poetry of place to read and learn in Anderson's spirit-bird language how “the desert rests on giants / whose bones hold up the earth.”
– Michael Dwayne Smith, publisher/editor of Mojave River Press & Review